Actionable Design Tips for Startups

Startups are popping up everywhere with an emphasis on the freedom for people to embody their ideas and let the world see it. However, most startups don’t have design founders or have inexperienced designers joining startups in hopes of hitting it big.

As a designer, I’ve made many mistakes and have seen other young designers doing the same. Based on my experience designing websites for startups and attending startup events and hackathons and observing the creative process, I have developed some tips for getting through the startup process.

Let’s look at 10 ways you can improve your designs in a current or future startup to build stronger brand, drive more visitors, achieve better conversion rates and generally succeed.

1. Simplify

Many startup websites are loaded with graphics, options and choices. Simplify your website’s user interface, get rid of unnecessary elements and leave the things that matter the most. “Less is more” is a great rule to follow.

Make your website easy to navigate, use simple copy for navigation, include search, clickable logo, everything that visitors are used to. Following some web conventionsmight be a good idea, too.

Main things to consider:

  • Visual hierarchy. Make sure

Ways to Use Color in Web Design

The current landscape of color in website design is interesting to think about. Most websites look more or less the same, yet color can be a powerful tool in design.

I’m not trying to state this as anything revolutionary or as an extraordinary find. But if most websites have similar color schemes, what does that mean for color? Actually, it means a lot. Imagine a world where every website was colorful – it would possibly be very pretty and rainbow-filled but it would mean that nothing stood out. It’s like having every paragraph bolded in your essay.

Therefore, when color schemes are muted, it allows for many opportunities.

Draw Attention to Anything You Want

Most websites start with a basic grayscale look – white background and black text. Color comes in as accents that get you to look places. That’s why websites are not filled with color – they use it to get you to look at the buttons, headlines or links.

Take Vibrant, for instance, when you first land on their home page the background and images are black and white. The logo, call to action and the hamburger menu are bright yellow. They stand

Ways to Improve Usability and User Experience by Decluttering Designs

We often speak about decluttering in the sense of physical stuff like closets or storage. But, we can also speak about decluttering designs too. Decluttering can help improve usability and the user experience on websites.

Here are four tips for decluttering you designs.

1. Shorten the Copy

Dating back to 1997, Nielsen Norman Group conducted a study to learn how users read on the web. I’m sure you know that they don’t read. Instead, most people scan the pages. Yet, there are plenty of websites filled with unnecessary words. Unfortunately, copy that is messy or indirect is common. You can clean up the content of a website by removing the amount of words on the screen.

Remove unnecessary words. Shorten run-on-sentences and remove redundant sentences, too. Always have one idea per paragraph. It’s a good form of writing and it’s better for those readers who scan. Finally, and this is true especially of long-form content, use the inverted pyramid structure. Start with the conclusion and add more detail as the content gets longer.

This is one of my favorite apps, Days. It’s an app for counting down days until an event. The app’s landing page has very little

Ways Creative Web Designers Work on Awesome Websites

An awesome website created by a talented and creative web designer is a thing to behold. Websites like these, set the bar so high that even approaching that level of craftsmanship seems out of reach. It sometimes seems that this task requires a level of creativity we have yet to achieve.

Like many other things in life, it’s doable. It may take years of training, and involve a fair share of sweat and tears but, — it is doable.

Let’s see how creative web designers work their magic

What are some of the key characteristics top-tier creative designers have in common? Here are five of the more common ones:

1. They work with concepts – and not just with design techniques

Coming up with great conceptual designs takes research, experience, and digging into what other creatives achieved. Success comes when you are able to take a concept, and bend it into something that offers a realistic solution to a client’s brief.

In the example above, that looks easy-going with a playful twist, the relationship between the headline and the visual provides a grand introduction.

2. Creatives keep their head in the clouds, but their feet firmly

Web Design Trends to Try in 2017

Ready to refresh your website? The start of the year is a great time to take a hard look at your existing design – or even new projects – and think about how to incorporate some of the latest trends into the framework.

From functionality to color and typography, 2017 will be a year of new ideas and new visual concepts to explore. Some of those designs are already starting to pop up, providing you with just enough visual inspiration to get off to the right start in the new year. Let’s take a look.

Web Design Trends 2017

1. Gradients

Missing from the design landscape for a few years, gradients are making a major comeback. But the look of the color blurring technique has shifted.

In the last round of gradients, there were subtle variations throughout the design. Apple’s iOS icons were a prime example. Now, gradients are big, bold and use plenty of color.

The most popular usage is a two color gradient overlay on photos. (This technique can look absolutely amazing!) It’s a great option to switch up your look or to make a less-than-interesting photo a little more intriguing.

Missing Features of Your Web Design

As a business owner, have you ever been totally clueless as to why your website isn’t converting? Do you feel like you have everything in place, yet your audience isn’t following through on your call to actions buttons, and your bounce rate is sky high? There could be a few crucial web design features that are missing on your website, and adding and adjusting them might mean the difference between success and failure.

Use this article as a ‘checklist’ to see whether your web design is on par, and which features you can implement to boost conversions and encourage engagement.

At the end of the day your audience will be attracted to modern design, elements they sub-consciously accept as the norm, because they’ve had that user-experience on other websites. Think of modern design as a combination of art, design, and functionality. When these elements ‘work’ in harmony your page will be undeniable and ultimately guide the visitor to where you want them to be.

So, ‘What’s Missing’?

1. Web Design That’s not Unique to Your Industry & Brand

Your web design is the first impression a visitor will have about the business. This

Design Trend For Windows Which Capital Is On The Web

Modal windows are those popup windows that appear over the screen rather than opening a new tab/window. They usually darken the background to bring attention to the popup.

Most websites running modal windows add some type of call to action whether it’s a button or a form or something. But it can also be a simple message about browser features like disabled JavaScript or an adblock extension.

Everything in the window takes precedence over the page so these modals are meant to draw attention. They can be annoying and outright infuriating but numbers don’t lie: they work.

Let’s delve a bit into current trends of modal windows to see how they work and why you’d use them.

Dark Backgrounds & Clickable Areas

Modal windows follow a similar design strategy and they’re not very complicated.

They mostly all use a darkened background on the page to bring attention to the modal content. This shouldn’t be a pitch black background because that can feel intimidating.

Instead the user should see a touch of the page behind the background, but it should have a reduced opacity. This could be 90% or 50% depending on how much you want

Tips on Hiring the Best Web Designer

Hiring a web design can be an exciting process. When I talk about hiring a web design in this post, the advice can be applied in a variety of ways. First, it could mean hiring a single, usually freelance, designer for a job you need to be done. It could also refer to a web design agency.

Additionally, it could be advice for hiring a web designer for your own team. The advice is valuable for web designers who are looking to improve their portfolio. Now, let’s discuss five different but important things when trying to hire a web designer.

The work shows off responsive design

It’s still surprising how many times responsive designs don’t make it into a web designer portfolio. It’s hard to say if a designer is capable of delivering responsive design if it’s not there. It could be omitted by mistake or because they have never done it. You can’t tell if it’s not there. Now, this guide refers to a web designer.

The web is a flexible medium that works on the tiniest devices and their tiny screens to larger devices and their larger screens. It’s important for any website to

Tips for Designing UX For Dropdown Navigation Menu

Dropdown menus have come a long way thanks to modern JavaScript and CSS3 effects. But not all dropdowns are created equal, and some UX strategies work better than others.

In this guide I’ll cover a handful of design techniques for building usable dropdown navigation menus. This includes multi-level dropdowns and mega menus which all rely on the same core design principles.

Markers For Sub-Menus

It’s a good idea to include markers for links that have sub-menus attached. These small visual indicators let users know where links are placed and how to access them.

And these rules apply to all menus whether you’re designing with 1 tier or 4 tiers of links.

Markers can range from arrows to dots or squares or anything noticeable. Most users are smart enough to pick up what the symbol means, so long as it’s universal.

The Threadbird navigation is a fantastic example of this effect in action.

Some of their links have sub-menus while others don’t. In fact some of their links have sub-sub-menus which you can only discern by their unique marker next to each link.

Threadbird uses the right-pointing double angle quotation mark, simplified to raquo. Web designers prefer this

Steps to Create a Web Design Style Guide

Creating websites is getting more and more complex and is usually not a one person job. It is important to ensure that design is consistent and optimized to meet business objectives and create enjoyable experiences for users.

One of the ways to ensure that team is on the same page when designing separate parts of the website or saving designs from developers is to create design documentation or a web design style guide.

It is beneficial to have a style guide in order to create a cohesive experience among different pages. Also it helps to ensure that future development or third-party production will follow brand guidelines and will be perceived as part of the overall brand.

Luke Clum has touched the surface of using style guides as your first step in web design last year and I would like to take a more in-depth look on how to create a usable web design style guide for your projects.

What is a Style Guide?

A style guide is a collection of pre-designed elements, graphics and rules designers or developers should follow to ensure that separate website pieces will be consistent and will create a cohesive experience at the end.

Documentaries Design Inspiring

Documentaries have a profound effect in terms of their ability to both teach and inspire. As designers, we are one of the primary creative industries and always looking to find and use inspiration, whether it be from images, art, products, or even music.

Below I have compiled a list of six inspiring design documentaries that should help serve as excellent resources to help you learn something new, however advanced you are as a designer. They have all taught me something new about design and design thinking, as well as inspiring me with new styles and ways of working.

 1 Design Is Future

This is an inspiring documentary that is exceptionally well put together. ‘Design Is Future’, which is held at Disseny Hub Barcelona during Barcelona Design Week, explores ideas for the future of design and talks about its rise to prominence over the last decade or two.

It explores some interesting thoughts about the role of design, design thinking, and poses questions to some of the most forward thinking design professionals around today. There is particularly excellent insight into design as a tool to help with innovation and sustainability for people, businesses, and society as a whole.

Web Design Drawing Attention Through Color

Working with color can be so much fun. Color can set the mood and tone of a design. Color can make a design appear clean or messy. Another thing we can use color for is to draw attention to a desired piece of content or element.

In this post, we’ll go over the various way in which color can be manipulated to draw attention to something. Some of the examples will talk about repetitiveness, some about photography and others about how a lack of color can be a strategic thing too.

Let’s get started in analyzing how to draw attention through color.

Nursing bras, photography, and attention

There are a plenty of website designs out there that make use color in a strategic way. Color is so versatile and comes in all different shapes and forms. For instance, when I speak about color in design most people assume about things like text or buttons. We’ll get to that. For now, I want to talk about the less obvious way we color effects a design, through photos.

Storq is clothing store for pregnant women. Overall, the website doesn’t feature too many colors. However, on the product pages, the

New Rules for Scrolling in Web Design

What was once taboo in website design has made a complete resurgence as one of the most popular techniques in recent years as users are finding a new love and appreciation for sites where scrolling is a necessity. Shedding its old stigmas, scrolling is reinventing itself as a core interaction design element – that also means designers need to learn the new rules.

In this piece, we’ll explore the rebirth of scrolling, discuss some pros and cons, and list out some quick tips for the technique.

Why Scrolling is Reborn

The simple answer is mobile devices.

Ever since mobile users have surpassed desktop users, UI designers everywhere have adjusted accordingly. And with so many users on smaller screens, scrolling is becoming more of a necessity: the smaller the screen, the longer the scroll.

But there are other factors. Access to high speed internet is available in more places, making the scroll a quicker way to access information than clicking from page to page. The growing strength of social media sites also feeds the technique: scrolling naturally accommodates their wealth of user-generated content.

As explained in the guide Web Design Trends 2015 & 2016,

How To Manage White Space in Mobile Responsive Layouts

White space is a crucial design tool whether you realize it or not. Many designers adjust page elements until they “look good”. Most often this leads to a natural balance of white space between page sections just from gut instinct.

But when you get into responsive design this subject gets a bit tricky. White space needs to be adjusted at different breakpoints to create a seamless experience for all users.

This can be done with many different techniques and I’d like to cover the best ones here. All modern websites should be fully responsive so it’s no question that responsive design is important. The only question is how to handle white space so that all users have an awesome experience.

Rearranging The Navigation

Naturally the first thing every designer considers is how to handle the navigation menu.

If a site has dozens of links you really don’t have many options. You could use a select input field or a hidden menu with the three-bar hamburger icon.

Here’s an example where the top navigation doesn’t even resize. Once your browser window hits a certain breakpoint the links automatically hide into a menu and get replaced with a hamburger icon.

Design Engaging Newsletter Layouts

Newsletters still offer the best way to reach your audience directly and increase sales. But if you’ve never managed an email list before this can be an intimidating process.

Once you have a list you’ll need to send out emails that connect with subscribers and offer real value. This means great content and great design all wrapped up in a pretty bow.

Let’s dig into the UX side of email design to consider what makes an email engaging. This goes far beyond a great headline and once you know how to design emails you’ll see incredible results with your open rates.

Single-Column Layouts

Emails need to be designed smaller because email readers like Outlook have more restrictions than web browsers. This means your average newsletter is rarely larger than 600px wide, so it’s best to use a 1-column layout or at most a 2-column layout.

When you plan your content it’s good to organize this into a single column format. Think about how you can organize your writing so it flows down the page and offers an easy reading experience.

Take for example the WistiaFest 2017 newsletter design. Each section of the design spans the entire width

Implement Consistency in Web Design

There’s tremendous value in consistency of digital interfaces. People browsing the web encounter dozens of websites that all have different styles, yet most feature very similar page elements.

Most designers don’t even think about these features. Page headers, navigation menus, body copy, CTA buttons, the list seems endless.

By designing with consistency you’ll learn how to create interfaces that encourage typical user behaviors. Your layouts will build trust and teach users repeatable patterns that help them work through your site much quicker.

Design For User Expectations

Most users expect websites to work a certain way. It should scroll vertically, links should be clickable, and the navigation should be visible right from the first page load.

How you design these expectations is completely up to you. But when you’re designing for consistency you want to keep a clear uniform design across the entire layout.

This site has many portals linking to their forums, their eCommerce shop, and their online help guides. All of these pages have the same design and the same navigation to keep them consistent with the entire site.

Users don’t want to think. They just want to act and get results. Consistent

Masculine and Feminine Design Techniques

A user’s first impression of your site can be a lasting one.

In the first few seconds, a person decides to stick with your content or move on. They will also make decisions about whether your site fits their needs. And that first impression has a lot to do with sex.

Male and female users often look to the web for different experiences. The look of your site can instantly appeal to one of the sexes or both.

But how to you know? There are commonly held ideas about what appeals to each gender; here we will apply those principles, and even stereotypes, to design theory.

The first design element a user sees on site is images – especially images containing people.

What do these people look like?

Demographically, it is likely that the average adult website visitor will look very much like the people on the site. This applies to age, race, size and even gender.

But what if your images aren’t representative of the average adult visitor? Think about a site that contains more images of inanimate objects, landscapes or babies. Those images have certain appeal for the genders as well.

The exception to the image rule is in oversexed